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Reviewed by roses on
im finding this website SUPER helpful. i am about to go gluten free for a minimum of 3 months and i am using this is a good reference to get started.
my big question is what can i substitute for tapioca flour? i need to be off of tapioca now as well? any input will be very helpful
Reviewed by jamie on
Corn Starch or Potato Starch can both be used as a substitute.

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English Muffins

YIELDS 10 Muffins

TIME: 60 minutes

by: America's Test Kitchen, The How Can It Be Gluten Free Cookbook

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Ingredients

  • 3 3/4   ounces (3/4 cup) GF cornmeal 
  • 2          cups warm water (110 degrees) 
  • 2          large eggs 
  • 2          tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled 
  • 14       ounces (3 cups plus 2 tablespoons) ATK Gluten-Free Flour Blend
  • 4          ounces (1 1/3 cups) gluten-free oat flour 
  • 1 1/2   ounces (1/2 cup) nonfat dry milk powder
  • 3          tablespoons powdered psyllium husk
  • 2          tablespoons sugar 
  • 2 1/4   teaspoons instant or rapid-rise yeast
  • 2          teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/2   teaspoons salt
  • 3          teaspoons vegetable oil

Preparation

Why This Recipe Works: Our Classic Sandwich Bread proved to be a good starting point for this recipe—the dough has the necessary flavor and richness—and the classic technique worked well. We portioned the dough into rough balls and let them rise on two rimmed baking sheets until nearly doubled in size. The dough was rather sticky, and we had trouble dusting them with cornmeal (which helps create the distinctive crunch on the exterior of any good English muffin). We found it easier to sprinkle the rimmed baking sheet with cornmeal and then sprinkle more cornmeal over the top of the risen dough rounds. In order to create their distinctive shape and crumb, it’s necessary to flatten the dough rounds both before and during griddling. While some classic recipes cook the muffins entirely on the stovetop, we thought the crusts became much too hard. One minute of griddling per side was sufficient. We then transferred the muffins to a baking sheet and finished by bak‐ ing them in the oven to ensure they were cooked through but not overly browned. Do not substitute soy milk powder for the milk powder in this recipe, as it will negatively impact the flavor and structure of the English muffins.

 

1. Sprinkle 1/2 cup cornmeal evenly over 2 rimmed baking sheets. Whisk water, eggs, and melted butter together in bowl. Using stand mixer fitted with paddle, mix flour blend, oat flour, milk powder, psyllium, sugar, yeast, baking powder, and salt together on low speed until combined. Slowly add water mixture and let dough come together, about 1 minute, scraping down bowl as needed. Increase speed to medium and beat until sticky and uniform, about 6 minutes. (Dough will resemble cookie dough.)

 

2. Working with 1/3 cup dough at a time, shape into rough balls using wet hands, and space at least 1 1/2 inches apart on prepared sheets (5 per sheet). Cover loosely with lightly greased plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

 

3. Adjust oven rack to lower‐middle position and heat oven to 350 degrees. Remove plastic and, using greased metal spatula, press dough balls into 3/4‐inch‐thick rounds (about 3 1/2 inches in diameter). Dust tops of muffins with remaining 1/4 cup cornmeal.

 

4. Heat 1 teaspoon oil in 12‐inch skillet over medium heat until shimmering, about 2 minutes. Wipe out skillet with paper towel, leaving thin film of oil on bottom and sides of pan. Carefully lay 4 muffins in pan and cook until bottoms are just set, about 1 minute, occasionally pressing down on muffins with spatula to prevent doming.

 

5. Flip muffins and continue to cook until set on second side, about 1 minute longer. Transfer muffins to clean baking sheet lined with parchment. Repeat with remaining 2 teaspoons oil and remaining muffins in 2 more batches, wiping skillet clean before each batch and transferring muffins to same baking sheet.

 

6. Bake until golden brown and firm, 30 to 35 minutes, rotating sheet halfway through baking. Transfer muffins to wire rack and let cool for at least 20 minutes before splitting with fork and toasting. Serve. (Once cooled, unsplit English muffins can be stored in zipper‐lock bag for up to 2 days.)

 

Freezing tips: Let English muffins cool completely, then wrap individually in a double layer of plastic wrap and then a layer of aluminum foil before freezing. A single English muffin, wrapped in a paper towel, can be microwaved for 20 seconds, then split and toasted.

The_How_Can_it_be_Gluten_Free_Cookbook

 

 

 

 

 

 

This recipe is from: The How Can It Be Gluten Free Cookbook

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Average Rating:

::Comment

Reviewed by roses on
im finding this website SUPER helpful. i am about to go gluten free for a minimum of 3 months and i am using this is a good reference to get started.
my big question is what can i substitute for tapioca flour? i need to be off of tapioca now as well? any input will be very helpful
Reviewed by jamie on
Corn Starch or Potato Starch can both be used as a substitute.

Leave a Review








Please type the letters and numbers shown in the image.
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